Leridon Prize attributed to Beya Gille Gacha and Adejoke Tugbiyele

The Leridon Prize was awarded on October 10, 2019 by Gervanne Leridon at the BISO Biennale Internationale de Sculpture of Ouagadougou.

Gervanne Leridon surrounded by members of the BISO Jury – Biennial International Sculpture of Ouagadougou

Congratulations to the two winners: Beya Gille Gacha and Adejoke Tugbiyele!

Created at the initiative of the Burkina Faso photographer Léon Nyaba Ouedraogo and the contemporary art sales manager of the Piasa house, Christophe Person, the first edition of the Biennial International Sculpture of Ouagadougou (BISO) is held from October 6 to November 15th 2019.

Born from a Cameroonian mother and a French father, Beya Gille Gacha uses beads inspired by the Bamileke tradition to cover her sculptures. Her series of ORANTS questions the themes of childhood and education. In ORANT # 5, a child breaks the concrete floor to reveal the earth and plants three highly symbolic and fertile trees: Shea, Nere and Bamboo. The artist wanted to recall the visionary word of Thomas Sankara, who instituted planting a tree at every great event. Breaking the framework imposed by education and society, this child dares to take his place in society and creates a new future, placing environmental and ecological issues as priorities.

ORANT #5, 2019 Dimensions variables ©Beya Gille Gacha
Illustration photo of the article: https://www.jeuneafrique.com/840619/culture/burkina-faso-ouagadougou-accueille-la-premiere-biennale-de-la-sculpture-du-continent/?fbclid=IwAR2JztG51YM-IRH016GDBQmvXoMuQrROZs_1sD1bnQeUVZLQz6AE61J0TaU

Born in the United States and raised in Nigeria, Adejoke Tugbiyele is a committed queer artist. Her works celebrate the diversity, sexuality and individuality of black women and minorities, calling for a better balance between the sexes. Traditional brooms – historically associated with women – are transformed into lines and shapes that celebrate the essence, beauty and strength of women. Inspired by the vision and legacy of Thomas Sankara and his women’s liberation movement, the sculpture titled “Angel” suggests the presence of bi-spiritual beings full of feminine energy who may present themselves as divine angels.

Untitled, 2019. Dimensions variables ©Adejoke Tugbiyele
(détail) Untitled, 2019. Dimensions variables ©Adejoke Tugbiyele